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Irish rockers The Script and Danny O'Donoghue open up about career fears and changing their tune

THE Script frontman Danny O’Donoghue has opened up about the fear of losing his voice — and career — after undergoing two throat surgeries.

“I was told: ‘The doctor is going to slit your throat.’ That’s the reality of it,” O’Donoghue, in Melbourne today on a promotional tour, told Confidential. “There was a chance I would never be able to talk again. I had to sign a waiver saying I knew the risks.

“I just thought: ‘What am I gonna do? Do I just fade away?’ This is my bread and butter. I don’t do anything else. It was a big headf---.

“I’m a highly positive person,” O’Donoghue says, “but you can spend too much time focusing on that one per cent of, ‘what if it goes wrong?’”

In late 2015, after four hit albums and five world tours, The Script, a rock band from Dublin, went on hiatus.

Their hits include Breakeven, Hall Of Fame, and Superheroes.

But in July this year, O’Donoghue revealed, in that time away, he’d had two surgeries to have nodules on his vocal chords removed.

“I’ve made a few lifestyle changes,” he says today.

“We were burning the candle at both ends, man. You end up catching fire or running out of wax. We did both. It gave me a real slap in the face about having a long career versus running myself into the ground.”

His post-operative treatment included no talking for two months. That was gradually softened to five minutes of talking every hour. “You can’t burp, you can’t cough, you can’t laugh,” he said. To communicate, he used a type and speak app.

In late 2016, The Script began work on their new album, Freedom Child. Sheehan performed vocals on the demos as O’Donoghue recuperated.

But as the songs took shape, O’Donoghue and Sheehan realised another voice was emerging. “We aren’t a political or religious band,” Sheehan says. “We always avoid those two subjects.

We’re a band about escapism. Our doors are open to everybody. But for the first time, we started thinking, and writing, as extroverts.”

The title track is a reply to Sheehan’s seven-year-old son asking his father: “What is terrorism?” Another song, Divided States Of America, is about the politics of distraction and disunity.

Make Up is a powerful piece about identity and pride.

But production choices on the album make strong statements, too, particularly detours into dancehall (Rain) and dubstep (Deliverance).

“Music has moved on so much,” Sheehan says. “Getting played between Drake and Justin Bieber is very difficult for a traditional band.”

O’Donoghue added: “It’s probably frightening to people who are used to the band side of things. It’s just evolution. We’re still a heartfelt band doing what we’ve always done: three mates sitting in a pub talking about life.”

Freedom Child (Sony) is out now.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/entertainment/confidential/irish-rockers-the-script-open-up-about-career-fears-and-changing-their-tune/news-story/dc1bb59c10563068f1a937c44b7784e1

THE Script frontman Danny O’Donoghue has opened up about the fear of losing his voice — and career — after undergoing two throat surgeries.

“I was told: ‘The doctor is going to slit your throat.’ That’s the reality of it,” O’Donoghue, in Melbourne today on a promotional tour, told Confidential. “There was a chance I would never be able to talk again. I had to sign a waiver saying I knew the risks.

“I just thought: ‘What am I gonna do? Do I just fade away?’ This is my bread and butter. I don’t do anything else. It was a big headf---.

“I’m a highly positive person,” O’Donoghue says, “but you can spend too much time focusing on that one per cent of, ‘what if it goes wrong?’”

In late 2015, after four hit albums and five world tours, The Script, a rock band from Dublin, went on hiatus.

Their hits include Breakeven, Hall Of Fame, and Superheroes.

But in July this year, O’Donoghue revealed, in that time away, he’d had two surgeries to have nodules on his vocal chords removed.

“I’ve made a few lifestyle changes,” he says today.

“We were burning the candle at both ends, man. You end up catching fire or running out of wax. We did both. It gave me a real slap in the face about having a long career versus running myself into the ground.”

His post-operative treatment included no talking for two months. That was gradually softened to five minutes of talking every hour. “You can’t burp, you can’t cough, you can’t laugh,” he said. To communicate, he used a type and speak app.

In late 2016, The Script began work on their new album, Freedom Child. Sheehan performed vocals on the demos as O’Donoghue recuperated.

But as the songs took shape, O’Donoghue and Sheehan realised another voice was emerging. “We aren’t a political or religious band,” Sheehan says. “We always avoid those two subjects.

We’re a band about escapism. Our doors are open to everybody. But for the first time, we started thinking, and writing, as extroverts.”

The title track is a reply to Sheehan’s seven-year-old son asking his father: “What is terrorism?” Another song, Divided States Of America, is about the politics of distraction and disunity.

Make Up is a powerful piece about identity and pride.

But production choices on the album make strong statements, too, particularly detours into dancehall (Rain) and dubstep (Deliverance).

“Music has moved on so much,” Sheehan says. “Getting played between Drake and Justin Bieber is very difficult for a traditional band.”

O’Donoghue added: “It’s probably frightening to people who are used to the band side of things. It’s just evolution. We’re still a heartfelt band doing what we’ve always done: three mates sitting in a pub talking about life.”

Freedom Child (Sony) is out now.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/entertainment/confidential/irish-rockers-the-script-open-up-about-career-fears-and-changing-their-tune/news-story/dc1bb59c10563068f1a937c44b7784e1

10.10.2017