The O'Donoghue Society

For all those interested in history and genealogy and whose names are derived from the Gaelic

August/September snippet: Irish Ghettos, where did the Irish settle in large numbers in your hometown? Response Seven: Worcester Massachusetts Irish

Contributed by Daniel Flynn

In Worcester Mass, the first large group of Irish arrived in 1820 to build the Worcester to Providence canal. They were prohibited from living in the village proper and were relegated to the swamp land along the Blackstone river where the canal was being built. Many of them stayed to build the Worcester to Boston  RR, which competed with the canal. Other Irish followed, especially in the wake of the 1840 famines, throughout the 1800s. By the end of the century Worcester had more Irish per capita than Boston, with many Kerry O'Donoghues. They moved up from the lowland on the east side of the village to the surrounding hills. Many emigrants from Italy, Russia, Poland, etc. followed, creating the polyglot East Side. Also living on the East Side in those early years were freed African Americans. I'm the 1950s, the polyglot whites and the African American kids played basket ball in the school yard. The African Americans on one team, calling themselves "boots", naming the mixed nationality white team as "paddys". Boots refers to boot black, an early occupation, during a time when most of their white neighbors were Irish.
Contributed by Daniel Flynn

In Worcester Mass, the first large group of Irish arrived in 1820 to build the Worcester to Providence canal. They were prohibited from living in the village proper and were relegated to the swamp land along the Blackstone river where the canal was being built. Many of them stayed to build the Worcester to Boston  RR, which competed with the canal. Other Irish followed, especially in the wake of the 1840 famines, throughout the 1800s. By the end of the century Worcester had more Irish per capita than Boston, with many Kerry O'Donoghues. They moved up from the lowland on the east side of the village to the surrounding hills. Many emigrants from Italy, Russia, Poland, etc. followed, creating the polyglot East Side. Also living on the East Side in those early years were freed African Americans. I'm the 1950s, the polyglot whites and the African American kids played basket ball in the school yard. The African Americans on one team, calling themselves "boots", naming the mixed nationality white team as "paddys". Boots refers to boot black, an early occupation, during a time when most of their white neighbors were Irish.
04.09.2019