The O'Donoghue Society

For all those interested in history and genealogy and whose names are derived from the Gaelic

March Snippet: Books I have read and why they helped me understand historical Ireland and my O'Donoghue family - Response Two

Contributed by Mike Donahue

An anthology of newspaper columns written by Finley Peter Dunne helped me understand what life was like in Chicago when my great grandfather, Patrick Donohue and his wife, Mary Kelly Donohue raised their family in the Southside neighborhood called Bridgeport.
 
Dunne was an American journalist; he was born in Chicago in 1867. His Irish immigrant parents settled in Chicago at about the same time as my great grandfather. By 1900, Finley Peter Dunn was the most widely read newspapermen in Chicago.
 
To tell his stories, Dunne created a character named Mr. Dooley, the proprietor of a saloon on Archer Avenue, at the north end of Bridgeport. In Dunne’s newspaper columns, Mr. Dooley discussed the news of the day while serving a customer named Malachi Hennessey.
 
Mr. Dooley and Hennessey spoke in the dialect of the unfashionable neighborhood where they lived; they were Chicago’s “shanty Irish.” Having them speak in dialect allowed Dunne to say what went unsaid in other (polite) newspaper columns. He described life of Bridgeport through Mr. Dooley's chats with Hennessey, painting a portrait of ethnic urban life in the neighborhood where my ancestors, including my grandfather, Mike lived and worked.
 
Dunne wrote more than 500 columns between 1893 and 1915. Selected columns were published in eight anthologies. I found copies in the Indianapolis Public Library and read two of them. They were insightful and reminded me that my grandfather, who was born just a decade after Finley Peter Dunne, likely read these same stories when they were first published.
 
Contributed by Mike Donahue

An anthology of newspaper columns written by Finley Peter Dunne helped me understand what life was like in Chicago when my great grandfather, Patrick Donohue and his wife, Mary Kelly Donohue raised their family in the Southside neighborhood called Bridgeport.
 
Dunne was an American journalist; he was born in Chicago in 1867. His Irish immigrant parents settled in Chicago at about the same time as my great grandfather. By 1900, Finley Peter Dunn was the most widely read newspapermen in Chicago.
 
To tell his stories, Dunne created a character named Mr. Dooley, the proprietor of a saloon on Archer Avenue, at the north end of Bridgeport. In Dunne’s newspaper columns, Mr. Dooley discussed the news of the day while serving a customer named Malachi Hennessey.
 
Mr. Dooley and Hennessey spoke in the dialect of the unfashionable neighborhood where they lived; they were Chicago’s “shanty Irish.” Having them speak in dialect allowed Dunne to say what went unsaid in other (polite) newspaper columns. He described life of Bridgeport through Mr. Dooley's chats with Hennessey, painting a portrait of ethnic urban life in the neighborhood where my ancestors, including my grandfather, Mike lived and worked.
 
Dunne wrote more than 500 columns between 1893 and 1915. Selected columns were published in eight anthologies. I found copies in the Indianapolis Public Library and read two of them. They were insightful and reminded me that my grandfather, who was born just a decade after Finley Peter Dunne, likely read these same stories when they were first published.
 
12.03.2019