The O'Donoghue Society

For all those interested in history and genealogy and whose names are derived from the Gaelic

Missing relatives in the 19th and early 20th centuries - notes in newspapers

Kim Cannon emailed me with
"I was trawling through some online newspapers today to hopefully find some missing clues to illuminate the disappearance of some particular elusive relatives who have so far escaped every past line of enquiry - when I saw the following MISSING advertisement for a Donoghue. Perhaps it is just the clue to someone’s immigrant ancestor that they have been looking for. Because the ad gives the person’s address it can easily be followed up. The National Library’s online website (TROVE) is a wonderful resource to find ancestors in early Australian newspapers & can often save one the cost of a certificate in identifying births, deaths and marriages. I recently found a marriage & birth in Papua New Guinea which I doubt whether I would have ever discovered otherwise.

 

Information from TROVE - so the original can easily be read online.

The Daily Telegraph, Sydney, NSW. Saturday 1st September 1906. Page 7.

DONOGHUE, Patrick, Left Manningham, England for New South Wales & was last heard from when going 250 miles from Sydney to work at railway construction. Sister Ann Donoghue, 55 Beamsley St, Manningham, Yorkshire seeks you."

People became completely lost to their families and were desperate to find out what had happened to them.

From Ancestry

For nearly a century, the Boston Pilot served as a beacon for Irish immigrants seeking information on loved ones they had lost contact with. Between 1831 and 1920, more than 45,000 advertisements were placed in the newspaper by recent immigrants looking for family who had come over earlier, by relatives back in Ireland, or by families seeking information on people who had moved elsewhere in the U.S. looking for employment.

 
 

Kim Cannon emailed me with
"I was trawling through some online newspapers today to hopefully find some missing clues to illuminate the disappearance of some particular elusive relatives who have so far escaped every past line of enquiry - when I saw the following MISSING advertisement for a Donoghue. Perhaps it is just the clue to someone’s immigrant ancestor that they have been looking for. Because the ad gives the person’s address it can easily be followed up. The National Library’s online website (TROVE) is a wonderful resource to find ancestors in early Australian newspapers & can often save one the cost of a certificate in identifying births, deaths and marriages. I recently found a marriage & birth in Papua New Guinea which I doubt whether I would have ever discovered otherwise.

 

Information from TROVE - so the original can easily be read online.

The Daily Telegraph, Sydney, NSW. Saturday 1st September 1906. Page 7.

DONOGHUE, Patrick, Left Manningham, England for New South Wales & was last heard from when going 250 miles from Sydney to work at railway construction. Sister Ann Donoghue, 55 Beamsley St, Manningham, Yorkshire seeks you."

People became completely lost to their families and were desperate to find out what had happened to them.

From Ancestry

For nearly a century, the Boston Pilot served as a beacon for Irish immigrants seeking information on loved ones they had lost contact with. Between 1831 and 1920, more than 45,000 advertisements were placed in the newspaper by recent immigrants looking for family who had come over earlier, by relatives back in Ireland, or by families seeking information on people who had moved elsewhere in the U.S. looking for employment.

 
 
05.04.2018