The O'Donoghue Society

For all those interested in history and genealogy and whose names are derived from the Gaelic

Snippets: February 'My family in the 1920s' - Response One - From Burma to the British Broadcasting Corporation

Algernon Charles O'Donoghue, known as Don, was born in Kindat, Burma in 1901. He travelled in 1907 to live in Bath, where his grandmother and some of his aunts lived, while the rest of the large family were spread across India and Burma.

During the First World War, Don enlisted in the mechant navy as a Marconi wireless operator, travelling to such exotic places as China, Japan and South Africa. After returning from Service, he made London his home, but regularly travelled back to Bath to visit his mother.

While in London he met and married Edith Cara Pope, known as Cara, the daughter of Edith Pope nee Batten, a Professor of Music and Richard Pope, a professional flautist.

Don's interest in sound and music led him into working in talking movies in the mid 1920s. This largely consisted in synchronising sound to vision.

Having been a Marconi wireless engineer, and working in the early days of film, he grabbed the opportunity to work in the Sound Department of the British Broadcasting Company before it became the British Broadcasting Corporation in 1927, working both in research and in the largest radio recording studio in Europe at the time.

It was a busy family time too, as my aunt and  father were both born at the very end of the 1920s.

In the 1930s he moved back to films working with Alfred Hitchcock and singer actresses such as Jessie Matthews.

During the Second World War he was at one time drafted to Cairo to work on sound wave detection through water; yet this was only discovered from his notes after he died. Had it been a secret....well, who knows.

Living in the 1920s and being a sound engineer married into a musical family, Don, with Cara enjoyed partying in the midst of the 'glamour' of sound stage and screen.

Algernon Charles O'Donoghue, known as Don, was born in Kindat, Burma in 1901. He travelled in 1907 to live in Bath, where his grandmother and some of his aunts lived, while the rest of the large family were spread across India and Burma.

During the First World War, Don enlisted in the mechant navy as a Marconi wireless operator, travelling to such exotic places as China, Japan and South Africa. After returning from Service, he made London his home, but regularly travelled back to Bath to visit his mother.

While in London he met and married Edith Cara Pope, known as Cara, the daughter of Edith Pope nee Batten, a Professor of Music and Richard Pope, a professional flautist.

Don's interest in sound and music led him into working in talking movies in the mid 1920s. This largely consisted in synchronising sound to vision.

Having been a Marconi wireless engineer, and working in the early days of film, he grabbed the opportunity to work in the Sound Department of the British Broadcasting Company before it became the British Broadcasting Corporation in 1927, working both in research and in the largest radio recording studio in Europe at the time.

It was a busy family time too, as my aunt and  father were both born at the very end of the 1920s.

In the 1930s he moved back to films working with Alfred Hitchcock and singer actresses such as Jessie Matthews.

During the Second World War he was at one time drafted to Cairo to work on sound wave detection through water; yet this was only discovered from his notes after he died. Had it been a secret....well, who knows.

Living in the 1920s and being a sound engineer married into a musical family, Don, with Cara enjoyed partying in the midst of the 'glamour' of sound stage and screen.

14.02.2020