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The O'Donoghue Society

For all those interested in history and genealogy and whose names are derived from the Gaelic

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Researcher's Tips

Birth years from census (UK) data
It seems almost universal for people to get a probable birth year from census data by subtracting the age from the census year. Certainly some websites and some census CDs provide this as "helpful" information. For me it isn't helpful and personally I always subtract one more year from the result. All the 19th century censuses except 1841 were taken the first weekend in April, so people were three times more likely to have been born a year earlier. E.g. if a person was 24 in 1851, the accepted guess by subtracting one from the other seems to be 1827 for the birth year. But in point of fact, making of course the big assumption that the age is correct, this person was probably born between April 1826 and the end of March 1827. Born any later and (s)he would have been only 23 at the 1851 census. So for 1851 I subtract the ages from 1850, and similarly for the other censuses. 24 from 1850 gives 1826 which is the true "most probable birth year". If you don't do this you may be looking in the wrong year when you go looking for details in the parish registers. Most baptisms took place before the child was three months old, and usually less than that. For someone who was "24" at the 1851 census, even the baptism may have taken place as early as April or May 1826, so I'd always start looking in 1826 and only go on to 1827 if I couldn't find what I was looking for. In 1841 the census was taken in June, and ages above 15 are usually in a state of confusion reflecting the enumerators' understanding, or more usually lack of understanding, of the guidelines. Ages above 15 were supposed to be rounded down to the nearest multiple of 5, so that "20" stands for anything between 20 and 24 and so on. But many enumerators gave up, ignored the instructions and gave the exact age - and I always offer up silent thanks when they did! But for ages under 15, or where the enumerator gave an age that was not a multiple of five, the birth still has seven chances out of twelve (and therefore still slightly more than 50%) of having taken place in the year before the one you get by merely subtracting the age from the census year. Source: Tony Woodward (GOONS)

Meet an O’Donoghue

The maps available on this page show the location of ‘O’Donoghues’ who are interested in meeting others in the society.  To discover where these people are, simply move to the region of interest and zoom in. By clicking on the pins on the map you will be provided with the email address of those people.
 
Your meeting could be a simple handshake and a short chat, but could end up being much more. So, whether it be in your home region or in a travel destination, give it a go. Who knows ? You might end up organizing a gathering !

 

To join this programme please go into your Profile in Members or Guests area.  Scroll down to the map, place a tick in the  Display my location box.  Then latch onto your pin and drag it to the place you want to use as your possible meeting location.  You can expand the map to whatever level of detail that you may require.  Please remember to Save after placing your pin. 

Pins represent people who have said that they are willing to be contacted. The society offers this as a service to its members and guests, but takes no responsibility for the meetings.