The O'Donoghue Society

For all those interested in history and genealogy and whose names are derived from the Gaelic

Blog

The blogs are for reporting or discussing something or some subject.

As distinguished from our forums which are for family history enquiries and responses as now, where people are looking for someone or something and the journal which is for longer well researched articles usually, but not exclusively, of a historical or genealogical nature.

This page lists all blogs in date order. The links to the left allow you to see the blogs categorised by subject matter.  To add Comments click on the Category and then on the title to the blog you wish to contribute to.

In order to post you must be logged in.  This is necessary to avoid spam type attacks on site.
 
15.04.2017

Jamie Donoughue is an Oscar® nominated British film director, producer and writer. He is best known for directing short-film Shok that earned him critical appraisal and multiple international awards including Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film nomination at the 88th Academy Awards. In 2016, he directed two episodes of the critically acclaimed BBC / Netflix drama The Last Kingdom and is currently directing the second series.


The Last Kingdom is a British television series, an eight-part adaptation of Bernard Cornwell’s historical novels series The Saxon Stories. The series premiered on 10 October 2015 on BBC America, and on BBC Two in the UK on 22 October 2015. A second series of ten episodes co-produced by Netflix after the exit of BBC America has been announced. The second series began airing on BBC Two in the UK.

Set in the late ninth century AD, when England was divided into seven separate kingdoms. The Anglo-Saxon lands are attacked and, in many instances, ruled by Danes. The Kingdom of Wessex has been left standing alone.

The protagonist Uhtred, the orphaned son of a Saxon nobleman, is captured by Viking Danes and reared as one of them. Forced to choose between a kingdom that shares his ancestry and the people of his upbringing, his loyalties are constantly tested.
The first series' story-line roughly covers the plots of the original two novels, The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman, although condensed for the purposes of television. The second series' story-line will roughly cover the plots of the third and fourth of Cornwell's novels, The Lords of the North and Sword Song.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Kingdom_(TV_series)

 
31.03.2017

Ancestry has added a collection of Thom’s Irish Almanac and Official Directory published from 1850 to 1946.

The collection provides more than six million records, with names, places of residence, and sometimes occupation, provided for most.

The collection includes some gaps; the missing volumes are 1860-62, 1873, 1895, 1900, 1905, 1920, 1923, and 1927. From its first publication in 1844, Thom's directories grew to include a Dublin street directory, and multiple lists of names, addresses and occupations for residents of other towns and districts in the country.

They included a wide range of detail about state institutions and businesses, including Members of Parliament, the Civil Service and legal profession, the church, navy and army, educational establishments, and the peerage, as well as county fairs and markets, county and borough listings and postal directories.

31.03.2017
With acknowledgement to Sean Murphy https://www.facebook.com/Sean-J-Murphy-777246545723294

Hitherto the only online research facility for the Irish Registry of Deeds has been the worthy indexing project at http://irishdeedsindex.net, which is very much a work in progress. The Mormon FamilySearch has now come to the fore by placing online Registry of Deeds grantor and placename indexes and transcripts of deeds ranging in date from 1708 until 1929 (https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/185720…). This is a massive digitisation programme of thousands of microfilms made in the early 1950s, and quite legible in most cases. These records are not databased as yet, and so must be browsed for entries, using the limited grantors and placenames indexes for guidance.

Again it should be noted that these Registry of Deeds records relate in the main to wealthier families and it would be a rare tenant farmer or labourer who would be found therein. While skewed towards Protestants during the eighteenth-century penal era, the wealthiest Catholics too will appear in the Registry, and by the nineteenth century denominational exclusion is less in evidence. Those new to the Registry of Deeds archive should remember that the massive online listing is divided into grantors' indexes (grantees are not indexed separately), land or placename indexes, followed by the largest element, the transcripts of deeds. The indexes from 1708 provide three key references, namely, volume, page and memorial number, and in 1833 an improved indexing system including address of property was introduced. The index references lead to the relevant memorial transcript, which in most cases tends to be a complete or substantial transcript of the original deed.

I tested the system by searching for the famous 9,000-year lease whereby Arthur Guinness acquired the core of the brewery at James's Gate in Dublin in 1759. It took a bit of navigating, but as the grantor Mark Ransford was known, I was eventually able to progress from the grantors index entry under letter 'R' 1759, to the transcript of the deed (volume 201, page 554, memorial number 134396), which was easily downloaded as a JPG image file. Until a full database of the digitised records is completed, we will not be able to search quickly for grantees, family members, witnesses and other named individuals in deeds.

Once more the Mormons have acted to digitise Irish records where our government has been slow or inactive, in the case of the Registry of Deeds, represented by the Department of Justice. This fearsome agency has for a number of years banned users from taking photographs of records in the Registry of Deeds. The deeds repository is a remarkable archive dating from the later Stuart era, which somehow escaped the destruction which befell the Public Record Office in 1922.

The FamilySearch initiative is a marvellous gift for genealogists and historians in Ireland and abroad, but those who live within striking distance of the Registry of Deeds in Henrietta Street, Dublin, will obtain maximum value from the repository through continued personal visits, now supplemented by free digital searches and downloads. For more on the history and record organisation of the Registry of Deeds, see my article, 'A Most Valuable Storehouse of History' (http://www.historyireland.com/…/a-most-valuable-storehouse-…).

 

31.03.2017

Trump DESTROYS Obama-era regulations

It’s a kill-shot straight at Obama’s unfair regulations. Trump is aiming to unshackle the U.S. economy and fulfill a campaign promise — and will unravel much of Obama’s liberal legacy in the process.

Sponsored: Obama’s parting shot could silently kill millions of seniors

The order will suspend, rescind or flag for review more than a half-dozen measures in an effort to boost domestic energy production in the form of fossil fuels.

As part of the roll-back, Trump will initiate a review of the Clean Power Plan, which restricts greenhouse gas emissions at coal-fired power plants. The regulation, which was the former president’s signature effort to curb carbon emissions, has been the subject of long-running legal challenges by Republican-led states and those who profit from burning oil, coal and gas.

Trump has repeatedly criticized the power-plant rule and others as an attack on American workers and the struggling U.S. coal industry.

In addition to pulling back from the Clean Power Plan, the administration will also lift a 14-month-old moratorium on new coal leases on federal lands.

 

Trump accused his predecessor of waging a “war on coal” and boasted in a speech to Congress that he has made “a historic effort to massively reduce job-crushing regulations,” including some that threaten “the future and livelihoods of our great coal miners.”

Sponsored: If you haven’t heard of H.R.6 then this could save your life

The order will also chip away at other regulations, including scrapping language on the “social cost” of greenhouse gases. It will initiate a review of efforts to reduce the emission of methane in oil and natural gas production as well as a Bureau of Land Management hydraulic fracturing rule, to determine whether those reflect the president’s policy priorities.

It will also rescind Obama-era executive orders and memoranda, including one that addressed climate change and national security and one that sought to prepare the country for the impacts of climate change.

The administration is still in discussion about whether it intends to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change. But the moves to be announced Tuesday will undoubtedly make it more difficult for the U.S. to achieve its goals.

Sponsored: 2 new strange words are on death certificates across America

The power-plant rule Trump is set to address in his order has been on hold since last year as a federal appeals court considers a challenge by coal-friendly states and more than 100 companies who call the plan an unconstitutional power grab.

Opponents say the plan will kill coal-mining jobs and drive up electricity costs. The Obama administration, some Democratic-led states and liberal groups, countered that it would spur thousands of clean-energy jobs and help the U.S. meet ambitious goals to reduce carbon pollution set by the international agreement signed in Paris.

According to an Energy Department analysis released in January, coal mining now accounts for fewer than 70,000 U.S. jobs. By contrast, renewable energy — including wind, solar and biofuels — now accounts for more than 650,000 U.S. jobs.

Sponsored: Clinton Foundation now linked to thousands of senior deaths

The Trump administration’s plans drew praise from business groups and condemnation from environmental groups.

U.S. Chamber of Commerce President Thomas J. Donohue praised the president for taking “bold steps to make regulatory relief and energy security a top priority.”

“These executive actions are a welcome departure from the previous administration’s strategy of making energy more expensive through costly, job-killing regulations that choked our economy,” he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.
https://thehornnews.com/trump-destroys-obama-era-regulations/
 

20.03.2017
A trio of collections, including service records and pensions, relating to the RIC have been sourced from the National Archives in Kew, London and put online by findmypast
12.03.2017
BBC2 March 2017

An ultimate endurance challenge as some of the UK's fittest men and women are pushed beyond their mental and physical limits by battle-hardened veterans from the world's toughest special forces.

Meet the recruits

Who thinks they are tough enough?

Lynsey Donoghue  

Age: 34 Occupation: Firefighter

12.03.2017
Findmypast have announced the creation of the Roman Catholic Heritage Archive in early February last which aims to digitise the historic recordsof the Catholic Church in the United States, Britain and Ireland.

They have released three million exclusive records including sacramental registers for the Archdioceses of Philadelphis from 1757 bto 1916 as well as for the Archdioceses of Westminster and Birmingham from 1657 onwards.

This builds on last year's publication of more than ten million Irish Catholic parish registers
06.03.2017

When I visited Ross Castle about 10 years ago the lady giving the guided tour pronounced O'Donoghue exactly as my Mum did - O'Dun a hoooo.  I live in the London area and my Mum said that her father re-introduced the O' back into the name after most of Ireland went back to being Irish! 

Colleen

27.02.2017
This subject gave rise to the longest forum thread on the old site.  I have captured it as a blog - there is some extraneous material but it might get a few folk going...

13/01/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Sharon (Donohue) Guerra
My maiden name is Donohue, which I always pronounced as Don-Ah-Who (as in 'dawn'). As a matter of fact, one kid used to tease me all the time, 'Donna Who?' Then, in my mid twenties, a boyfriend at the time pointed out that I said my name differently than the rest of my family - who pronounced it Dun-ah-who (as in, 'done'). Why hadn't I noticed this? (Btw, I live in Western PA, USA). Recently, while beginning my genealogy research, I learned that my grandfather's name was actually spelled Donohoe, not Donohue. This spelling survived registration at Ellis Island, so I don't know why or how it was changed after he arrived in America. Family legend has it that another sister who also emmigrated to America, spelled it incorrectly herself and then forced the other siblings who already arrived in America to change their names to match hers. Who knows. My Donohoe's were from Leggatinty, parish Tibohine, frenchpark, Co. Roscommon. Hope this helps.
Thanx, Sharon
 
22/01/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Nigel John O'Donoghue
I am not sure if it is my west country accent, (Bristol, England) or what, but I was brought up to pronnounce our name Oh-don-ogg-hue, oh as in hoe, ogg as in fog and hue like view. I have no more information about my lineage other than my grand father hailed from somewhere in Tipperrary and moved to Bristol in the 1920's to set himself up as a pig farmer (a venture which never worked properly) any correspondance woulde be appreiceated.

24/01/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Robert Donehoo
My name DONEHOO in the southern USA is pronounced don'-eh-hoo. The Irish origins is in Cashel and the spelling seems to be consistant from the mid 1700's. Sounds like a interesting project.

24/01/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
System Administrator
Terrence
Apologies for not coming back to you on the two enquiries I said I would make. I have not heard from the Donohoe in Australia I am afraid. During the Clan meeting of the Donohoes of Cavan last year I did make enquiries and the view was that the name was pronounced Don rather than Dun. Your project is getting a lot of interest and more input from people in Ireland would be helpful. The subject would make a good article for the newsletter in due course - how about it?
All the best
Rod
 
These are messages waiting to be published.  Actions are taken here
24/01/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
System Administrator
Terence
Further apologies for spelling your christian name incorrectly in my previous message!
Cheers
Rod

30/01/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Donald Kent O'Donohue
Our Grandfather, Christopher Patrick O'Donohue, was from Cork where we still have family. His father was from Youghal. My Grandfather came to the US around 1900 along with three brothers and a sister. The US family members pronounce the name Oh-Don-Oh-Hew, the Irish cousins pronounce it Oh-Don-a-Hoo. I hope this helps.
don
 
30/01/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Karen Donhou
Although the spelling is now Donhou pronounced Donhue, my ancestors did not always spell it this way. Onr particular set of grandparents seemed to change the spelling - Donohoe - Donohue, this could possibly be down to someone misreading the o and the u as Donohoe seems to be written more than Donohue., this was around the 1857 period. However, I have relatives in the U.S. and also in Canada who also spell our surname Donhou. My grandfather and my two uncles and most of my cousins pronounce it Donoo. Hope this is of help to you.
Karen Donhou
 
30/01/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Barry Donoghue
My family adopts the 'donoghue' phonetic form of the name. Apparently the 'O' was dropped when my forebears paid the bills (family joke).
 
30/01/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
ian donhou
TO KAREN, FROM IAN ,IF U ARE RONS DAUGHTER PLEASE E.MAIL ME BACK ,WE ARE NOW LIVING IN AUSTRALIA, I AM BRIAN & DOREENS SON
FROM IAN
 
01/02/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Anne Ahmad
As far as I know, we have always pronounced our name Dah - no - hue. We apparently lost the 'o' somewhere around the turn of the century. Our family has it's roots in Kerry. Amongst the family, they all refer to themselves as 'Donnies'. My grandfather's cousins emigrated to Australia and New Zealand in the early part of this century (from about 1910 - 1920). One of my grandfather's cousins was a jockey (Steve Donoghue). He apparently settled in the US (my grandmother thought it was near Chicago). We have lost touch with the people in Australia/New Zealand/ and the USA. After my grandmother died in 1977, no one remembered where they were.
 
18/04/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Philip Michael O'Donoghue
G'day, Kia Ora & Dia dhuit!
Pronunciation of 'O'Donoghue' in NZ is /Oe Don uh hoo/ which is basically inmy opinion a standard English language reading of the anglicised name of O~ donnachadha. However, my grandfather and uncles would especially in festive moods & in their cups exclaim ' The Dunn uh hoos' as a toast or warcry. alos in Ireland and overseas I notice Irish people always pronounce the name not Oe but /Aw dunn ih hoo/, no doubt carried over from the original Gaelic pronunciation of the real Gaelic O~ Donnachadha - 'donn' means brown or brown-haired nd is pronounced /dun/ . I trust this contributes to the debate.
 
04/07/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
David Donahoo
My surname is DONAHOO. We pronounce it as it is spelt - DON-A-WHO. This originated in Ireland, County Tipperary, parish Kilmore, Townload of Curryquin. Back then the name was DONOHOE.
 
27/08/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Michael Gerard O'Donoghue
Hi
Pronunciation of O'Donoghue in north west England is 'Oe Don uh hoo'. Although over the years I've noticed it has tended to become more 'Oe don a hoo' as I've moved out of Irish circles. My uncles and great uncle all laid great stress on the O and tended to pronounce it as two words Oe Donuhhoo. Most of them lived in or around Kerry/Cork for most of their lives and I always assumed that was the Irish pronunciation.
Nice to find the site and the interest.
Ged o'Donoghue
 
07/09/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Kevin Edward Donahue
We pronounce it (Donahue) Don-ah-hew. We are not sure about the spelling. My great great grandfather who somehow came to Mobile, Alabama, USA in the early 1840's and could not read or write. His name appears as Donho, Donoho and a few other variations in the various records we found. My ancestor didn't know how to spell, but his wife could as suddenly the name became Donahue forever more. No clue where Thomas Donahue was from in Ireland, but his wife was supposedly from County Louth. I couldn't say how her roots influenced the spelling & pronunciation.
We're in the north for two generations now (Racine, Wisconsin), and the pronunciation still holds with that of the southern branch.
Good luck! k
 
21/09/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Jennifer-Maureen O'Donoghue
Growing up in Australia and living in New Zealand I concur with Rod O'Donoghues original comment.O'Donoghue (county Kerry/Dublin)my family and here in New Zealand have always pronouned O'Don (as in on) o (as in 'oh') hue (as in hew or hugh)The 'g' is silent...which explains why my surname is mispelt quite often :-) good luck with your research J.M.O'D Wellington ,New Zealand

22/09/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
tomais o donnchadha
There is no doubt in my mind. The O Donoghues of Glenflesk, whether present day residents or emigrants like my grandfather, pronounce the name Uh Dunn/uh/hoo. My dad and his siblings insisted on that pronunciation and scorned those who proclaim themselves Don/a/hues, pronounced as it is spelled, or Donny/yews, God Forbid, as some do,these days. I spend a lot of time in Kerry and West Cork and our way is their way of pronouncing the name. I have tapes to prove it, and have just sent Rod a tape of an Irish woman singing the ballad of Jack O Donoghue, the Australian outlaw.If he puts this in our newsletter you will hear for yourself. Better yet,go to Glenflesk and stay with Sheila and Flor O Donoghue at Salmon Leap Farm in the townland of Inch. Slan agus Beannacht agibh. Is mise le meas.
Tomais O Donnchadha

19/11/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
Patrick Donoghue
My family and all our relatives here in the southern half of Alabama, Mobile and Baldwin Counties pronounce our last name as Don-nuh-hew, if the O is utilized in front of the name it is pronounced as Oh or a long O sound. Our ancestors to my knowledge are from Killarney and or Kerry. So the last name is pronounced as if the o in the first sylable is a short o sound, in the second sylable as if there is a double n, and the last sylable ends in a w sound. Even relatives that I may not see for years pronounce it in this manner.

12/12/2000 00:00
Pronunciation
John Patrick O'Donoghue
I am from Belmullet, Co. Mayo and my family (mum and Dad) live in Australia. We pronounce the name DUH-NA-WHO.
Cheers
John O'Donoghue

01/01/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Alicia DeNood Ayer
Both my grandparents were Donoghues; both were born in the 1860's; both emigrated from Kerry, (Lomanagh and Lisbaba,) to Holyoke, Massachusetts. I don't know how they pronounced the name, but my aunt (1900-1981) said DUH-nih-Hoo and my mother (1907-1991) said DAHN-nuh-hue. (My mother lived in Boston for her formative years.)

20/01/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Daniel Patrick O'Donoghue
Hello all,
I'm Dan O'Donoghue (officially no O on birth cert as my father didn't have one but rest of 8 brothers and sisters did) pronounced as they do in Kerry - O' dunna-who. I am working in England but from Tralee, Co. Kerry, having been born in New York. My father comes from Glenflesk where there is a Donoghue castle (or whats left - originally the Donoghue's of the Glen, descended from Geoffrey O'Donoghue (I think but not 100% sure) who split from the Donoghue's of Ross (ross castle, Killarney))- (all a bit simplified really).
However, to shed light on proper pronunciation (if there is such a thing) one should look to the Irish (Gaelic)pronunciation which is phonetically (at least in the munster dialect)pronounced:
O dunna koo
If we silence the guttural stop (k) you get Dunna hoo, I suggest this is proper pronunciation for any one derived from the Kerry clan. Whether this applies to the Cavan branch, the Donohoe's I doubt, but then again they are as such unrelated to the Kerry clan.
Yours sincerely Dr. Dan O Donoghue
 
25/01/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Robert Randall Donahoo
I am a Texas Donahoo, and pronounce my name just like it looks...I took a trip to Ireland last year, and everyone I spoke to about my name seemed to think it originated in County Kerry or Galway. Tell me more about Tipperary, Kilmore and Curryquin. I'm real new to this, but very interested in where I came from.
 
26/01/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Donald R O'Donoghue
Hello Philip, Her in the states my family always pronounced the surname as Oh-don-ah-hugh. However much like yourself, my Grandfather after a few jars would introduce himself to folk as Oh-don-ah-hoo. Many of my cousins from co. Cavan pronounce it the same way. Philip seems to be one of the main names in our family, an uncle, a great-uncle, and a great-grandfather. Does anyone claim Cavan as a home?
Talk to you again, Don
 
26/01/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Donald R O'Donoghue
Hello Dan,
My grandfather hailed from Cavan, and the name was pronounced very much like your own. Though my great-grandfather came to America and then returned to Ireland,settling down in Co. Cavan to raise his family, there is questions about the origins of his father, Edward O'Donoghue, who married Rose Blake (c.1860), moved to America (Philadelphia), and returned to Ireland after the loss of two children due to some epidemic. Any connection, or knowledge of a Drumcor Parish? Thanks for your time, Don
 
 
01/03/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
David Donahoo
Hello, in Melbourne, we immigrated in 1864 as DONOHOE. But the son born in Australia always called himself don-ah-hoo, so he changed the name around the age of 18. So Donahoo was born in Melbourne, Australia. We came from County Tipperary, townland of Kilmore, and I think a location of Curryquin, but I have never been able to locate this place on any map. We had dropped the O while in Ireland, so if anyone knows of any books on why donohoe's or similar names arose in County Tipperary I would be interested in hearing about them. thanks David D
 
19/03/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Janet Donohue Ebner
I grew up pronouncing Donohue as 'Donna-who', but was told that 'Donna-hew' was also correct. People outside of our family often pronounced it 'Dun-a-hew' so I always thought that it was a reflection of their roots.
 
01/04/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Michael Donohoe
My family are from Co. Wexford in Ireland and have always pronounced our name Done-ah-who.. the O was dropped sometime during the 19th century. Donohoe is not a very popular name in Wexford but I think we hail from the Kerry branch.
 
16/05/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Gregory L. Donoghue
Colin: My Great Grandfathers name was also John Donoghue, born 1824 in Ireland. He emigrated to the Southern U.S. in Feb. 1850 landing at Mobile, Alabama, having departed from Cork, Ireland. I have no other information about my ancestors except there is reportedly a Kelly, possibly John's Mother. John named his children: Mary Catherine, Mary Margaret, Mary Ellen, Mary Emma, James Thomas, John, Joseph and Harry. There were no issue for James Thomas, or John, but information on where abouts of Harry Donoghue are not known. He was reported to have set off for Houston, Tx or St. Louis, Mo as a young man, never to be heard from again. He was born around 1868, and was taken in by a family in Aberdeen Mississippi when his mother and father died from yellow fever in 1873 and 1874. We have Americanized the pronunciation as Don-a-hugh, however, I am sure it is correctly pronounced as Don-a-hoo! Regards!

16/05/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Chris O'Donoghue
When he moved to the US in the 1900s and he brought along his sister what was her name?
 
02/07/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
David Donahoo
In the book that Rod wrote, it shows that Donahoo's originated from many places in Ireland. All I know at this time is that my ancestor - Darby Donohoe lived in County Tipperary, Townland Kilmore, in Curryquin. It is near the Silvermine mountains. If you are interested in more general details of the Donahoo's I suggest you get a copy of Rod's book. You can order it through this site. It is worthwhile reading. I am intersted in finding out whether any other DONOHOE's came from Tipperary, especially between the Silvermine mountains and Nenagh!
 
 
11/07/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Nancy
Hello, I am looking for a John Francis Donoghue who was in the Battle of Little Big Horn in Montana. He was born in 1850 and died around 1924 in Butte, Montana. John had at least one daughter named Pearl. I guess thats all I know.
Thanks,
Nancy
 
02/09/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
John Michael O'Donoghue
Greetings,
My Grandfather emigrated to the U.S. from Cahir, in Tipperary. I've found two sources in Ireland for the family:one in cork, and one actually in Cahir. In response to Don's query, I knew a family of Donahoes, first generation, who were from Cavan. This was in Boston,Ma. They now reside with family in Cork. A genuine pleasure, John M. O'donoghue
 
02/09/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
John Michael O'Donoghue
Hi folks,
My Grandfather emigrated to America from Cahir, Tipperary. We've pronounced the name (O-Dunn-a hyugh) and for a long time believed it was either his pronunciation, or an Americanism. We're definitely aware of different soundings(we're from Boston) but at the same time wondering, is it a family accent? When visiting relatives in Tipperary, my relatives heard the pronunciation (Dunn-a-hoo). We hope this helps out. We're,of course, quite stumped. Regards, John M. O'Donoghue
 
20/10/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Philip Michael O'Donoghue
Greetings cousins near and distant! I still maintain that my grandfather's generation would lapse into DUN-a-hoo when all together at wakes etc. The tendency has been to pronounce O'Donoghue as Oh-DON-ih-hoo so that other people of non-Irish ancestry spelt it right! (the -og- was the usual sticking point). I've noticed that Irish-born people pronounce the Don as DUN (and the O' as Aw not Oh). The Irish Gaelic 'donn' meaning dark or brown is pronounced more like 'dun' and since it forms part of our illustrious name, this would help explain the Irish pronunciation of Aw DUN a hoo. I agree with Rod that regional variations of English eg England, Amercia, Australia, New Zealand etc would explain some other variations of pronunciation eg DUN vs DAHN with the latter sounding very much an Americanism, presumably around Boston. Arohanui & Sla~n agaibh.
 
20/10/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Philip Michael O'Donoghue
Hi Don, a hundred thousand apologies for not replying sooner. I think we have established that pronunciation of 'Don uh hoo /Dun uh hoo' can vary depending on degrees of sobriety among the older generation! :-) Philip as a family name here I thought was mostly in the mid-1950s. Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip were out here after her coronation in 1953 so there were swags of Philips named then even in families of Irish Catholic extraction. Our branch of the family hails from Glenfesk, County Kerry. Thanks for your reply and by all means keep in touch and note new e-mail @ddress. Ka kite ano. (Maori for See you again) agus Sla~n agat. Phil.

20/10/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Philip Michael O'Donoghue
That reminds me, Rod. When are we going to deal to the McCarthys and get West Cork back?! I remember a venerable McCarthy gleefully pointing out they drove us out when I was hitching in Ireland in 1987 ( as if it was only the week before!) :-) Sla~n.
 
08/11/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
System Administrator
Philip
What we need to do is get an active local society going for the Kerry O'Donoghues and then march on West Cork collecting tribal members and other clans equally upset by the MacCarthys (other than those who are my friends of course)on the way. We would get really good coverage in the local newspapers and political circles, and through shrewd use of spin doctoring, get history re-written and re-occupy Cashel. We would then move up to Kincora in Clare and ensure that the O'Briens were no longer a problem (other than my publisher's wife who is an O'Brien) in order to satisfy Tom, and correct another sad period of O'Donoghue history.
By the way would you please send me your Glenflesk family history via e-mail some time. I have noted Glenflesk but do not have any other details. Actually I just want to check that there are no MacCarthys in your heritage! I have got O'Sullivans and O'Mahonys (and the latter are a borderline case!). My daughter has just married a Kelly and that's OK because in Galway the O'Donoghue tribe was one of three who had the right to inaugurate and depose the O'Kelly clan chiefs, so if he doesn't behave I will take the necessary action.
Slan go foille
Rod
 
10/11/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
tomais o donnchadha
I'm with you,Rod and Phil. O Donnchadha A Buaidh! Let the war pipes strike up The Eagle's Whistle.

12/11/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
tomais o donnchadha
I think that we should give Cashel to the O Sullivans in order to ensure their help against the McCarthies. After all, they are Eoghanachta Casel, and we are Eoghanachta Rathlinn of West Cork. We should be content to get West Cork back. Just how to handle our erstwhile associates, the Cineal Aodh ( O Mahonys,) is a delicate issue, given what happened between us after Clontarf.
 
23/11/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Padraig Donohoe
Hey, Im from Ballyconnell, Co. Cavan! Its done - no - ho!
 
03/12/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
Steve Lominac
Does anyone know the origins of the County Kerry town of Lomanagh or Lomanagh. I am researching my surname and was wondering if it possibly came fronm there as a place name. Thanks. Steve Lominac
 
05/12/2001 00:00
Pronunciation
System Administrator
Steve
There is a townland (a smaller division of land within a parish) called Lomanagh (there are various spelling variations)in Kerry. It is located near Kilgarvan on the hillside above the River Roughty.
All the best
Rod

25/03/2002 00:00
Pronunciation
Hilary Joan de Birch
It's Er-don-er-who ........ surely! 150 years out of Clare!!!!
 
 22/04/2002 00:00
Pronunciation
robin poling
wanted to know the pronounciation of grandmoter

14/05/2002 00:00
Pronunciation
Julia Donohoe
Hi, I pronounce my name the same way as you. I'm not really sure where my relatives are from. I live in South Australia. I migrated here with the my parents in 1964. Mother Pamela, sister Anne, brother Martin. My father's name was John Donohoe. He was born in London, in 1922, son of John Donohoe and Ellen Donohoe (nee Kelly). They were from County Mayo and County Sligo, but I'm not sure who came from which. They married in St. Patrick's Church, New York, and had half their children there. They went to London and had more children there. My dad's brothers and sisters names were Patrick (1905), Sheila, Helen, Mary, Kathleen, Christine, Margaret, Joan, Jane (died at 3 yrs), Owen. I would love to find out anything about my name or my relatives.
Cheers from OZ! Julia.
 
07/01/2003 00:00
Pronunciation
MATГЌAS DOWLING
Hello! My name is Matías I born and live in Buenos Aires Argentina country with mora than 80 irish - argentinian societies under a Big Federation. Well I study gaeilge (or I will try to !) but my muncheoir don´t know how write and pronounce my first name and my original surname... My name is Matías (from Latin tongue...) in English it´s Mathias (Not MATT or Matthew...)and my actually surname wich is DOWLING BUT the original form WAS Ó DÚNLAING. How correctly must pronounce my first name and my surname in the Irish language ? Could you try to help me? It´s very important to me and my folks here... Thank you very much best wishes in this new year !!! Best regards. Matías Dowling.
 
20/01/2003 00:00
Pronunciation
Kay Mills
We will be in Ireland in July and are looking for pronunciation of towns. I seem to be having no luck, Do you know of a source?
 
22/01/2003 00:00
Pronunciation
System Administrator
Matias
I am afraid I do not know the Irish equivalent of Mathias. The closest is Matheus which is in Irish Mathgamain (pronounced Mahgumon see below). Your surname is pronounced O Doonlong (the final 'ai' sounds between an 'a' in hat and 'o'in hot - there is an Irish word baile which sounds like bolle.
Any O'Donoghues (however spelt)in your societies?
All the best
Rod
 
01/02/2003 00:00
Pronunciation
Rommel Malinao
what is the meaning and the origin or genealogy of my family name.

16/02/2003 00:00
Pronunciation
Natalie Donhou
hi dont know if you responded 2 ian, but i am brian brothers (arthur) grandaughter natalie. Very very small world. Would be lovely to hear from you. xxx
 
26.02.2017
https://snookerhq.com/2017/02/12/brendan-odonoghue-wins-irish-masters/

By on ( 1 Comment )

Brendan O’Donoghue has won his second ranking event of the Irish amateur season after victory in the Douglas Jewellers Irish Masters in Carlow.
brendan-odonoghue-irish-masters-pjn

O’Donoghue, left, also beat young pair Luke Bateman and Ross Bulman. Photo credit: PJ Nolan

The Nenagh native beat Robert Murphy 4-1 in the final at the Ivy Rooms, the same player he overcame for success in the Barracks Classic at the outset of the campaign.

With this triumph in the fifth ranking event of the term, O’Donoghue overtakes Michael Judge at the top of the rankings list.

Judge, winner of the last two tournaments on the calendar and also a member of the victorious All-Ireland Club Championship team with Q Club Wicklow, suffered a surprising 3-0 defeat to Benny O’Brien in the last 16.

O’Brien went all the way to Sunday’s semi-final, where his impressive run eventually came to an end against Murphy, while O’Donoghue narrowly defeated national champion TJ Dowling in the other last four encounter.

The sixth ranking event will take place early in March before the campaign concluding National Championship in April and May.