The O'Donoghue Society

For all those interested in history and genealogy and whose names are derived from the Gaelic

Blog

The blogs are for reporting or discussing something or some subject.

As distinguished from our forums which are for family history enquiries and responses as now, where people are looking for someone or something and the journal which is for longer well researched articles usually, but not exclusively, of a historical or genealogical nature.

This page lists all blogs in date order. The links to the left allow you to see the blogs categorised by subject matter.  To add Comments click on the Category and then on the title to the blog you wish to contribute to.

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01.08.2019
Contributed by Thomas Witte
Colleen Donahue Witte and the Cemetery Lots

Recently I was engaged in a conversation with my wife (Colleen Donahue Witte} that started me thinking of things that had happened when we lived Duluth, MN and of dying and of graveyards.

We had bought a home on London Road in a lovely area across from Lake Superior. While we lived there we enjoyed walking along the Lake Superior shore. Very near our home was a small lovely looking cemetery situated on a slope gently leading down to a small cliff overlooking Lake Superior. We very often walked by it and at times would walk through it. 

When we bought our house, the intention was to remain there for the rest of our days. I remember that I would joke that the only future move that I was going to make would just be across London Rd and down a couple of blocks. I of course was referring to the cemetery. 

I remember that we wondered if burial plots were available in the nice little cemetery. I did some checking at a local funeral home and found that it was the oldest cemetery in Duluth. Further I found that lots were available and who I could contact. My wife and I talked it over and thought in the interest of planning ahead that we should look into the matter. I called the contact person and made an appointment to see what was available and the cost etc. 

The man showed us four available plots and left us to consider what we would do.

I told my wife that she could choose which two to take. I recall how she would walk back and forth between the two sites which were separated by some distance. I would follow. She would ask questions such as “at which end of the site will our heads be.” She would then think some more and say something like, “This site doesn’t have as good of a view of the lake, or this one is further

away.” or “This would be the best if we could be sure that our heads would be on this end”. And on it went for about three quarters of an hour. She thought and pondered and walked and pondered and thought. Suddenly she said abruptly, “I don’t like this place!! I don’t want to be buried here!!!” I remember laughing because I knew now as then, that it was the thought of being buried that had suddenly gotten to her. I knew then that it would be best not to take her grave hunting anymore. Someone else would have to tend to that matter.

I had really wanted to get a place there and at that time was a little angry about her ways. But later I thought it was just as well because we left London Rd and moved far away. Besides the site I wanted probably required your head to be on the wrong end and “I wouldn’t get a good view of the lake”!!!.




 
01.08.2019

From Winona Republican-Herald, Dec 10, 1942;  

Jefferson Township is in Houston County, MN 

The History of Houston County MN says thus: “The first births in the township of which there are any record were those of Michael and Patrick Donahue, twin sons of Patrick Donahue. They were born in July, 1856. Their father Patrick Donahue was one of the first three supervisors of the township. 

From Thomas M Witte (apparently not related to Colleen’s Donahue family but settled in same area) 

01.08.2019
Contributed by Sarah Smith

Funny family story - passed down from my Aunt. I have not researched my family at all - no time! - so can't provide the detail you may require. However, I have no reason to disbelieve my Aunt!
 
My great grandfather O'Donoghue was the son of a local squire in the Kilkenny area. He eloped with one of the household maids to London and set up an antiques shop in Brompton Road. He was cut off without a penny and eventually abandoned his wife and children (one of whom, my grandfather, contributed to the household coffers by delivering papers from the age of six and lost part of his ear to frostbite in the process). She struggled on with the shop alone for a while and during that time she, in common with other local businesses, was approached by a businessman who was intending to form a limited company and transform the small department store he had just bought into what he apparently described as a Magnificent Emporium. He asked if she would like to buy some shares in his expanding business venture.  She apparently pooh-poohed the idea, saying, "what do I want with pieces of paper?"  What was the store called? Harrods. Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh.
 
14.06.2019
Contributed by Anita Donohoe
 

The Curse:

"In every generation, only one son will have a son who will carry on the family name."

There is a legend/curse in our Donohoe line where, in every generation, there will be only one male who will carry on the family name. Cursed by a widow, whose only son was tossed over the parapet by the 'O'Donohoe'. So far, it has held true.
14.06.2019
Contributed by Marcia Anne Donahue
 

To be honest, I proudly come from a long line of black sheep, so rather than having a black sheep in the family, I have a family of black sheep - Need I say more?

Rod:  I love it!

13.06.2019

Contributed by Kielan Donahue

My second cousin’s wife, upon meeting his mother, says her[the mother in law's] first words to her[the wife] were something along the lines of “Oh, I heard you’ve met my son, I’m sorry”. If that doesn’t qualify as black sheep I don’t know what does


 

12.06.2019
Brian Harold Donohoe was honoured as a Knight Bachelor for parliamentary and political service in the UK's mid term awards

Per Wikipedia: Sir Brian Harold Donohoe (born 10 September 1948) is a former Scottish Labour Party politician and former trade union official, who was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Central Ayrshire from 2005 until losing his seat in 2015.   Prior to constituency boundary changes in 2005, he was MP for Cunninghame South and was first elected in 1992
20.05.2019
Contributed by Kieran McNamara
 

Something of mild interest for you: a new French beer, brewed by a Donohue: http://deck-donohue.com/

 

I haven't tried it but I shall do my very best to do so soon.

From their web site

 

Nous existons pour creer des experiences gustatives

et encourager des relations profondes et durables.

We exist to create taste experiences and to encourage deep and lasting relationships


 

 

16.05.2019
Contributed by Michael O'Donoghue

I thought I would send a series of photos I have just framed.  It was only a few years ago I saw this pattern of photos. The first photo is of my Grandfather John Patrick ODONOGHUE with my father Owen. The second photo is of me with my father and the third with my son Patrick.  There is no photo like this with grandfather and any other uncles or my father with my brother. My son is now 15 years old so I could not recreate a photo but had to choose from a few photos.  So I am very happy with this photo series. To me it demonstrates a fathers love of his son that passes down generations and keeps the O’Donoghue family strong. 

 
16.05.2019
Contributed by Roger Key

I think that we could safely classify my Great Grandfather, William Patrick O'Donoghue as a pioneer. William was born  on the 20th or 22nd June 1862. ( We are still trying to find out where)
 
William had the dubious honour of having his name listed in the Police records the day he landed in Australia. This happened when he "deserted" the ship Argyleshire when it berthed at Port Pirie South Australia on the 5th May 1880. He was only 17 years old at this time.
 
From Port Pirie, William made his way up to Beltana in the north  of South Australia where he got himself a job as a Camel Driver.
This involved being a member of a camel train that took supplies From Mt Lyndhurst station near Beltana to the Overland Telegraph Station at Barrow Creek in the Northern Territory. The distance of this trip is about 1000 miles (1600 kms) each way.
 
William retained this position until 1885 when he left and took up horse breaking around Beltana closer to his family after having been  married in 1883.